Mombasa

We went to Mombasa last weekend, in partial fulfillment of our orientation requirements, and in partial fulfillment of ourselves and getting away from the busyness our lives are in right now. We stayed with some new friends of ours, Justin and Shannon Brown, in Mombasa’s Old Town which was built in the 1500’s. It was the closest we’ve been as a family to life in an islamic culture since Lesa, Sydney and I went to North Africa 3 years ago. Waking up in the middle of the night to the sound of the call to prayer in 12-part dissonant harmony from the dozen mosques in the vicinity, sweating it out in the oppressive heat and humidity even at 4 in the morning, reminded us alot of where we were when we experienced that original confirmation/call into missions. The drive to Mombasa from Nairobi is like this: 2 hours of the worst roads followed by 6 hours of the best roads in all of Africa. We left around lunch time on Friday, stopping along the way to treat ourselves with snacks and sodas and a sit-down Kenyan-style meal, and arrived at the Brown’s around 10pm. We didn’t sleep too well, though, as it was all we could to do stop thinking about the heat as we lay sweating on top of our beds, under the mosquito nets, with fans blowing on us. The next morning we did a little grocery shopping, ate lunch out, and spent the afternoon teaching at AIC Tudor, a large church in the Tudor area of Mombasa Island. Lesa and I had been invited to give...

Mom and Dad

Well, we haven’t blogged in a while because we’ve had a pretty crazy 3 weeks. My parents arrived on Good Friday and left last week. It was really great to have them visit, and we booked every day pretty solid with things to see and do. Oh, and we moved houses during that time too! Easter Sunday we went to Nairobi Chapel and then home for an Easter egg hunt and a big late lunch (photos here). Monday we had our friend Wycliffe take mom and dad and Lesa on a tour of Kibera, visiting the church that DCC helped sponsor and even making some home visits with Kibera residents. We wrapped up the day with Kenyan staple foods ugali and sukuma at Wycliffe’s tiny 1 room apartment on the edge of Kibera. The next day we toured the AIM AIR hangar, home to International Services, our division of AIM. While the kids crawled in and out of the airplanes, we visited with pilots and mechanics. We wrapped up with lunch at the Simba Saloon. The next day we went to the Nairobi Safari Walk, adjacent to the Nairobi Game Park. We saw pigmy hippos, albino zebra, a rhino, a leopard and a cheetah among other things. Then we spent the afternoon finishing packing for our overnight train ride to Mombasa. The train was quite an experience. It takes 45 minutes to fly from Nairobi to Mombasa, or a bone-jarring 8 or 9 hours in a car, or a slow 16 hours by train. Honestly, if I had to do it again I still would have picked the train....

Outer Banks – day 5

By the time we woke up, there was a steady, light rain. On TV we saw pictures of flooding everywhere around us, but our house was fine. We spent most of the day in our house, Lesa and the boys escaped for a while to do some school shopping for Robbie at the KMart down the street. We had promised ourselves on the way down we’d have one good seafood meal before we left, and this was our final evening to make that come true. On our way to find a seafood buffet, we stopped at a pier and walked out to the end to enjoy the enormous, turbulent, storm-tossed waves. Then we went down on the beach and the boys ran around in the shallow waves. The water was strangely warm, much warmer than the air by now. The meal we had was pretty good, Lesa and I decided not to cough up the $26/person for the buffet, but the kids were only $1 for each year of their age. Robbie ate way more than $7 worth of crab legs, so I guess it was a good deal. All in all, it was a really great trip. The first, long vacation we’ve had as a family when we’ve been by...
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