Like Christmas in September…

We’ve been in our house for about a month now. Truthfully, it was a little more like living in someone else’s house for a month, given that the only things we had that were really ours were whatever we brought with us in our 12 suitcases (plus guitar and keyboard) on our flight here. We were starting to get used to sleeping in someone else’s bed, in someone else’s sheets, cooking with someone else’s kitchen stuff, eating with someone else’s utinsels. Technically it was our stuff, since we bought the household contents from the previous resident, but still… cooking with anything less than Pampered Chef just isn’t the same (as Lesa would tell you). That all changed yesterday, when we got the long-awaited call that the sea container had finally arrived at the hangar. We cancelled all plans for the day and sped down to Wilson airport to inspect the contents and get our stuff… all 39 boxes of them! Stuff we hadn’t seen since May, when we packed it and drove it up to NYC to be put onto the aforementioned sea container. Stuff we couldn’t even imagine what it was since it had been so long since we packed it. Stuff we had learned to live without. Stuff we were extremely glad to see again: photo albums, decor, bicycles, everything that the Pampered Chef has ever sold, clothes, toys, videos, beds, mattress!, tools, and the list goes on and on. Anyhow, we praise God that it all arrived, that nothing was missing or broken (except a few bottles of shampoo that exploded all over the contents of...

A glimpse of Kenya

Cooking and grocery shopping have been a real adventure so far here in Nairobi. There are many things which we cannot get here at all. Then there are some things that are available… but only for a price (like Kelloggs cereal for $10 a box)! Missionaries here hoard chocolate chips, ranch dressing, Jello and pudding, and several other “everyday” items from America. I also just realized that I have to change some recipes because we’re living in a high altitude city, and that’s why the cookies and biscuits I baked were flat!! I’ve achieved several “firsts” already in the kitchen: homemade tortillas and tortilla chips, real whipped cream (no Cool Whip here), and chai (the Kenyan drink of choice). We’ve enjoyed getting to know the grocery stores and places to shop here. There are even malls here in Africa (some are really nice) – and the grocery stores are in the malls (along with the butcher, the pharmacy, the video rental store, etc.). Oh… and now we have Java House and Dormans, which lessens the pain we feel from missing Starbucks. What I wouldn’t give, though, for a fountain Coke – the bottled stuff just isn’t the...

Our house in Nairobi

My Aunt Shirley (who, with my uncle and 2 cousins, has lived in Nairobi for over 15 years) has had her ear to the ground since the beginning of the year, trying to find a house full of furnishings and maybe a vehicle for us. This week we were introduced, electronically, to a Canadian family who are moving back home and wanting to sell everything, more or less walking out of Nairobi with their clothes, but leaving everything else behind. Come to think of it, it’s much the same deal we’re doing here with Max & Rebecca. Handing down most of our stuff to someone who needs it more, getting the benefit ourselves of not having to sell it a piece at a time. Isn’t God...

Nairobi, part 2

Friday, Aunt Shirley drove us around Nairobi, to a shopping area where we were going to meet with another director at AIM. On the way, we really got to experience some of the more rural areas around Nairobi. The poverty here was incredible, many many roadside markets, people digging through garbage, workers harvesting produce in the fields, people walking everywhere you looked. Where were they walking to? How long had they been walking? It seemed like we could be out in the middle of nowhere, not close to any town, but everywhere you looked you’d see dozens of people walking along the road. We met with “K”, one of the directors of AIM, and had an incredible time with him talking about the work they are starting in North Africa, and TIMO (Training in Missions Outreach)- an intensive, medium-term, immersive introduction to missions. After our meeting with K, we visited the Masai Market, a big flea-market-like weekly market, and we grabbed several souvenirs here. Later that afternoon, we hooked up with our friends, John and Joy Haspels. John lived next door to me at Sterling College, and Lesa and him had many missions classes together. It was great to catch up with him, and hear about the building project he is working on in Loki, northern Kenya. That evening, Katie and I attended a worship concert at a big pentecostal church in Karen, near my aunt and uncle’s. It started out pretty slow and boring, a bunch of drawn-out, old American worship choruses. Katie and I tried to leave, but the monstrous downpour of rain must have prevented the...
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