Situation in Nairobi

We want to give you all an update on the situation here in Kenya, as we know it isn’t getting a lot of press in the US and what you are hearing may alarm you.   First, we are sitting in our (new) house, not having left our front gate for three days and wondering when we will be able to leave.   We are completely fine – we have supplies, food, water, etc. to keep us for a while.  We were prepared and expecting there to be an unstable situation for a few days after the election.  So, please, do not be concerned that we are in any danger because we are not.  AIM has kept us very informed and has required us to stay at home until the situation stabilizes and we feel completely comfortable with their leadership and experience in this kind of situation. Here is a run-down of what has occurred in the past week: The election was held last Thursday.  There are many parties here in Kenya, and the election process is very different than what we are used to.  Many people follow a party based on tribal lines, even though this is a “metropolitan” city.  Therefore the tribal animosities arise during election time especially.  The two main candidates were Kibaki (who was already president) and Raila.  In the first couple of days after the election, it looked as if Raila was winning.  Many people wanted him to win with the hope that life might get better for them than it has been under Kibaki.  There is a general mistrust of the government and here –...

Still waiting…

Well, we’re still patiently waiting out this election mess. It’s funny how the media here doesn’t show reports during the day about the riots going on throughout the country, instead they show 9 hours of the electoral commision chairman droning on and on with poll results as they come in. Either way it’s going to be a close race, and half the country is going to be upset about the results. The streets here are like a ghost town, either because people are glued to their TVs or because they’re afraid to go out. We’re doing fine. Had a little impromptu party yesterday with the stay-in-your-homes request from AIM, and are doing well. We’re just anxious for this thing to be over so people’s lives here can go back to...

Lockdown

Well, we’ve been asked to remain in our homes for today, for good measure. I know some mission organizations here actually required their missionaries to go back to the US during this time. But, we’re waiting it out. The issue with living in Nairobi right now is that this is a Kikuyu area, and it looks like Mwai Kibaki, a Kikuyu, is about to lose his seat as president to Raila Odinga, a Luo. For the past 2 days the news here has been droning on and on with election results (they’re still counting). Right now, out of 7 million votes, Kibaki is trailing by only 400,000. People are starting to get anxious because it is taking so long. Who knows what they’ll do when Raila is certified as the new president. Tensions in Kenya Over Election Results By ELIZABETH A. KENNEDY – 1 hour ago NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Hundreds of people stoned cars and rival ethnic groups fought in a sprawling slum Saturday amid tensions over delayed results from the closest presidential election in Kenya’s history, witnesses said. A millionaire opposition leader who cast himself as a champion of the poor appears poised to win the race, but only partial and unofficial tallies have been released from Thursday’s vote. In the Kibera slum, the main constituency of opposition candidate Raila Odinga, young men with machetes were running through the maze of potholed tracks and ramshackle dwellings. People set up makeshift roadblocks. About 20 miles outside Nairobi, hundreds of people were massed along a main highway. “They are looting houses and stoning cars,” Irungu Wakogi, a witness, told...

Brown Family Update – November 2007

Greetings Greetings once again from the city of cold water (that’s what Nairobi means in Kikuyu)! At least 4 days of the week that is true, the other 3 days it is the city of “hakuna maji”, or no water. Which is why we have 2 giant tanks in our back yard to store up water to get us through the dry days. Which means no laundry and few showers during half the week, making up for it on the other end. Not that things are dry here, quite the opposite in fact. The short rains (one of two rainy seasons here) have started this week and everything is muddy and wet. It’s even cold, which helps us remember that back home people are getting their turkeys and raking leaves and thinking about Christmas. It’s going to be a weird Christmas for us here, the start of summer and probably the 1st time we’ll have been hot since we left the US at the end of June. On Field Media The last time we wrote an update I (Andy) was just starting my job with the new On Field Media team. Mike and Ted and I have had a great time the past couple months pulling together our first video project and building our website to host all our content. Our 1st video, Psalm 40, is a worship video. Ted and I shot all the footage, in Kibera slums at a literacy class, in another slum at a health clinic, in Machakos at Scott Theological College, and in Korr, Kenya, in the remote desert northern frontier. After weeks of...

Life in Nairobi

A quick minute-for-mission video we sent to our supporting churches. A good view of the immediate area right around our house, a 2 minute walk to...
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