Declare

A Rendille man takes a break from his work to pull up his shirt and show me the teeth marks across his chest and back. The teeth, from a lion which nearly killed him as a young boy. His work now, as a bible translator, bringing the words of God to his people who have never had it. A North African woman, covered from head to toe in traditional wrap, speaks quietly to me for fear of being overheard. Her story, of how Jesus came to her in a dream telling her to follow him. Her fear, of losing her family and possibly her life, if the community around her finds out of her decision to follow Him. My good friend from Kibera, Wycliffe, smiles as he recounts his story. The panga (machete) scars across his arms serve as a constant reminder of his past: running in a gang, sniffing glue to numb the hunger pangs, sleeping in the street, and finally, coming into friendship with Christians who helped him get his feet on the ground and introduced him to Jesus. These three stories are a small sample of the stories I get to capture every week. Stories of how God redeems people from all walks of life, all nations, all religions, to free them from their sin and bring them into His family. Stories of how He releases them from shame and provides new life to those who have lost everything in their former lives because of their decision to follow Him. Stories of how nothing: not lions, nor governments, nor armies of those opposed to His work...

Brown Family Update – May 2008

Fell off the face of the earth? No, we haven’t, in case you’d wondered. Yes, we know we haven’t sent an email since March 5. No, it’s not because the rainy season knocked out the internet to all of east africa. Yes, it’s because we’re busy and sometimes lazy and forgetful, and often both at once. Consequently, since we skipped a month, we have a TON to tell you about! During the past two months, we have moved to a transitional home on a AIM missionary compound. Also, Lesa had her wrist surgery which ended up being fairly significant and is taking a while to recover fully. Praise the Lord that it is doing better every day! Mom & Dad We began our journey over the past few months with the visit from Andy’s parents over Easter. We had a wonderful time with them, somehow squeezing in trips to Kibera, an overnight ride on the Lunatic Line (go rent “Ghost in the Darkness“), a few days at the beach, a move, visits to the Rift Valley and Kijabe, and a game drive. Read the full story here. On-Field Media The OFM has been PDB (pretty darn busy) serving AIM throughout EA – East Africa (we are an organization that loves abbreviating). Andy’s got a few more stamps in his passport, and some great photos and stories as well. In March, Ted and I (Andy) went on a trip. We met some amazing national believers, some amazing Christian workers there, got spat on, rocks thrown at us, and all kinds of frontier-missionary kinds of stories to tell. Get our photos...

Mom and Dad

Well, we haven’t blogged in a while because we’ve had a pretty crazy 3 weeks. My parents arrived on Good Friday and left last week. It was really great to have them visit, and we booked every day pretty solid with things to see and do. Oh, and we moved houses during that time too! Easter Sunday we went to Nairobi Chapel and then home for an Easter egg hunt and a big late lunch (photos here). Monday we had our friend Wycliffe take mom and dad and Lesa on a tour of Kibera, visiting the church that DCC helped sponsor and even making some home visits with Kibera residents. We wrapped up the day with Kenyan staple foods ugali and sukuma at Wycliffe’s tiny 1 room apartment on the edge of Kibera. The next day we toured the AIM AIR hangar, home to International Services, our division of AIM. While the kids crawled in and out of the airplanes, we visited with pilots and mechanics. We wrapped up with lunch at the Simba Saloon. The next day we went to the Nairobi Safari Walk, adjacent to the Nairobi Game Park. We saw pigmy hippos, albino zebra, a rhino, a leopard and a cheetah among other things. Then we spent the afternoon finishing packing for our overnight train ride to Mombasa. The train was quite an experience. It takes 45 minutes to fly from Nairobi to Mombasa, or a bone-jarring 8 or 9 hours in a car, or a slow 16 hours by train. Honestly, if I had to do it again I still would have picked the train....

Brown Family Update – March 2008

Habari zenu! We decided it was about time for a new update – and there’s so much to tell!  Yesterday was Avery’s 6th birthday and we had 20 people here for cake and an awesome water balloon fight (which felt great in the current heat)!  We’re in the dog days of summer here, the hottest we’ve been since we arrived in Kenya 8 months ago. Still, it’s nothing like the humid summers we had in the US, more like a hot day in May in Denver, where it is still cool at night and you might wake up chilly if you sleep with your window open.  Oh, and speaking of heat, remember that vacation to Mombasa that we had to cancel in January? Well, we’re finally going to make that up, when Andy’s parents come to visit in 2 weeks! Situation in Kenya We’ve got some very uplifting news to share with you.  Last Friday Kofi Annan successfully negotiated a peace agreement between Kibaki’s PNU party and Raila’s ODM party. Kenyans have been celebrating and things seem to have cooled off tremendously since January. Kibaki will remain President, and Raila will fill a new post of Prime Minister. There’s obviously a great deal of work to do to figure out how that is going to work exactly and they are continuing to meet to work on some other issues which Annan wants to address.  Overall, it seems to be promising at this point.  There are still many displaced people throughout the country, though, which is a crisis that many churches and organizations, including AIM, are trying to address. Travels...
Page 4 of 8« First...23456...Last »