Water is life

About a year ago I traveled to Korr and Kurungu, Northern Kenya, to produce a film about the nomadic peoples of northern Kenya. When Ted returned from the US in May, he picked up this project which had been sitting on my desk waiting to be edited. I am so glad to see this project completed, finally, and am excited to see what God will do through this video to raise up prayer and mission support for the unique challenges of ministering to nomadic tribes. Korr remains one of my favorite places in Africa, and we are privileged to partner with the church and missionaries there...

Worship from the desert place

Cramming in the bed of a pickup truck with 21 Rendille women wearing little more than beads is an interesting way to spend your day. It was my 2nd time in Korr, Northern Kenya, in the desolate desert of what’s called the “northern frontier district.” Frontier is the right word, as this is past the edge of civilization by at least an 8 hour drive. The lack of water is a big problem in East Africa right now. 2 years of miserably poor rainy seasons and deforestation of parts of the Kenyan highlands have left many people in a bad state. (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8057316.stm) Especially in the desert, where people rely on their animals for survival, not just the meat but liquid from milk and blood. These people, mostly nomadic, move their entire village with the herds, or send the warriors out for months at a time with the herds, in a never-ending search for water and grazing. So when it doesn’t rain, the animals get sick and die, and the people lose not only their way of life but the very thing that keeps them alive. So, when we pull up to a village (a “goob” in the local language) with our Land Cruiser, the women (who have the job of finding water and firewood every day) seize the opportunity to save themselves a 4 hour walk to the well and back. They run to their huts, grab whatever containers they can find, and swamp the truck. You can’t imagine how many people can fit in the bed of a pickup truck until you try it. If there was room...

Mombasa

We went to Mombasa last weekend, in partial fulfillment of our orientation requirements, and in partial fulfillment of ourselves and getting away from the busyness our lives are in right now. We stayed with some new friends of ours, Justin and Shannon Brown, in Mombasa’s Old Town which was built in the 1500’s. It was the closest we’ve been as a family to life in an islamic culture since Lesa, Sydney and I went to North Africa 3 years ago. Waking up in the middle of the night to the sound of the call to prayer in 12-part dissonant harmony from the dozen mosques in the vicinity, sweating it out in the oppressive heat and humidity even at 4 in the morning, reminded us alot of where we were when we experienced that original confirmation/call into missions. The drive to Mombasa from Nairobi is like this: 2 hours of the worst roads followed by 6 hours of the best roads in all of Africa. We left around lunch time on Friday, stopping along the way to treat ourselves with snacks and sodas and a sit-down Kenyan-style meal, and arrived at the Brown’s around 10pm. We didn’t sleep too well, though, as it was all we could to do stop thinking about the heat as we lay sweating on top of our beds, under the mosquito nets, with fans blowing on us. The next morning we did a little grocery shopping, ate lunch out, and spent the afternoon teaching at AIC Tudor, a large church in the Tudor area of Mombasa Island. Lesa and I had been invited to give...

Election

Dear Friends, As you all are getting up from a late night, we were able to wake up at our regular hour this morning, just in time for the announcement of the election results, as we are now ahead of America’s east coast by 8 hours and ahead of the west coast by 11 hours.  It has been a bit surreal here, we can actually hear the sounds of celebration coming from the streets outside of our home.  Watching CNN this morning, the Kenyan station has inserted its own scenes continually of celebration activity around Kenya over the newly elected Obama, whose father is a Kenyan and whose grandmother still lives here.    The alternating scenes blending our two worlds together and bringing a visual to what often happens on our hearts – the leaping across the ocean often to remember and love you all in America and still live in a full reality here. We will be praying for our country as this new president gets his feet under him.  We are rejoicing with those who are joyously celebrating the election of our country’s first African-American.  He has a tough job ahead, and we know that even more now, living overseas.  What every American suspects, that America is a central focal point to the rest of the world and where many many people look for leadership, is so so true.  Do we deserve it?  We don’t know about that, but we do know that America has a responsibility to lead faithfully and wisely.  Let those of us who pray, pray that this new president will be able to do...
Page 2 of 812345...Last »