Orientation

Almost a year ago I was tasked with creating a video to be used across AIM to show what the orientation process looks like. Who better to have do that than the video guy whose family was just wrapping up their first term at new missionaries? Anyhow, we recently released this video, and it is now being distributed to all AIM missionary candidates, but we thought we’d share it here as well so you can enjoy what our last 2 years have been...

Meeting with AIM

This past weekend we met with David and Darlene Noden, the regional representatives for Africa Inland Mission. We had a great time talking with them about missions, and about the real, personal, and relational struggles that the mission field can create. Fits in nicely with the chapter on suffering I’m reading in John Piper’s Let the Nations Be Glad. Anyhow, Lesa and I feel led to pursue a position with AIM, hopefully with the media team in Nairobi. Right now we’re praying about the best time to do the “candidate week” in New York, which is required to be accepted as a missionary candidate. Their next candidate week is in November, the one after that is January. We’d like to do it as soon as possible so we can start raising funds, with the hopes of arriving in Africa maybe next fall. November is a bad month for us, though, the busiest time of year for church...

Nairobi, part 2

Friday, Aunt Shirley drove us around Nairobi, to a shopping area where we were going to meet with another director at AIM. On the way, we really got to experience some of the more rural areas around Nairobi. The poverty here was incredible, many many roadside markets, people digging through garbage, workers harvesting produce in the fields, people walking everywhere you looked. Where were they walking to? How long had they been walking? It seemed like we could be out in the middle of nowhere, not close to any town, but everywhere you looked you’d see dozens of people walking along the road. We met with “K”, one of the directors of AIM, and had an incredible time with him talking about the work they are starting in North Africa, and TIMO (Training in Missions Outreach)- an intensive, medium-term, immersive introduction to missions. After our meeting with K, we visited the Masai Market, a big flea-market-like weekly market, and we grabbed several souvenirs here. Later that afternoon, we hooked up with our friends, John and Joy Haspels. John lived next door to me at Sterling College, and Lesa and him had many missions classes together. It was great to catch up with him, and hear about the building project he is working on in Loki, northern Kenya. That evening, Katie and I attended a worship concert at a big pentecostal church in Karen, near my aunt and uncle’s. It started out pretty slow and boring, a bunch of drawn-out, old American worship choruses. Katie and I tried to leave, but the monstrous downpour of rain must have prevented the...

Nairobi

Our overnight flight to Kenya was very pleasant, and the Kenya Airways plane was absolutely the nicest plane we’d ever ridden on. We arrived around 6:30 in the morning, and were totally wasted. We slept maybe an hour. Sydney’s benedryll wore off shortly after supper, and she was up most of the flight. We met my uncle Roger and aunt Shirley (missionaries with AIM) at the airport, and they took us to a friends house for a short nap. Shirley then drove us through Nairobi (an adrenaline rush, if it’s your first time) to Rosslyn Academy, where Lesa and I led worship for a chapel service. This is the school where my cousins, Rachel and Hannah, attend. It was beautiful, as was Nairobi in general. Lots of trees and flowering vegetation, and such a great, mild climate that the school campus was a real open-air architecture. After lunch at Rosslyn, we went to an orphanage for infants who were orphaned by AIDS. Many of them had tested positive for AIDS because their mothers had AIDS, but we found out in many cases they end up not being infected at all. The next day we had planned a tour of the Kibera slums, but ended up spending the morning at the doctors office as Sydney was throwing up again, and had developed strange spots all over her torso and arms and legs. We thought it might have been an allergic reaction to the malaria meds she had just started taking, or maybe an interaction with the chickenpox vaccine she had had along with a buch of other required vaccines before...
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