Commissioned

The Commissioning Service at DCC was one of our most memorable experiences ever. The morning was filled with surprises for us – especially through many of our dear friends speaking and encouraging us from the stage, videos from friends in Africa, and photos of our time at DCC. It was also a significant morning musically. We sang some of our favorite songs, such as “Missions Flame” by Matt Redman, which speaks very clearly of how worship is the fuel (and the goal, John Piper!) of missions. This is where our heart is – we want to see the Lord worshiped in every tongue, in every nation. And our love of God and experience of a life of worship to Him drives us to help others find the same. At the end of the service, we sang “Jesus Paid It All” with our successor (new worship leader at DCC), John Webb. It was very powerful to lead worship together and transition from our leadership to his. Way cool. Our AIM regional administrators, David and Darlene Noden came for the service, as well. They spoke a bit about how our church needs to go ahead and “kick us out” 🙂 so that we can go – even though it’s hard for us all to part. We all talked about the fact that it’s not so much that we are leaving DCC to go on to something different, but that DCC is now going to Nairobi through us. We are still a part of this church body – functioning not as musical-worship leaders, but as missional- worship leaders. The elders anointed us...

Prayer letter (Winter 2006)

Merry Christmas from the Browns! We just got our Christmas tree up, and we’re already writing our “Christmas” letter (a big step for us)! We hope your holiday season has started off well and your tree is up! Things are going well here. Life is busy and in full swing as we are enjoying our ministry at Dulles Community Church, spending time with our kiddos, and giving LOTS of piano lessons. Robbie, who is eight and in 2nd grade, keeps busy playing with Legos and video games, practicing piano, losing teeth, and running around playing with his buddies. Avery, who is four and in preschool, learned to ride a bike this summer and is as happy-go-lucky as ever – following his brother around! Sydney is two now and talking and singing up a storm. Every place we go, someone is exclaiming how cute she is (what can we say?)! The big news… Two weeks ago we were officially “appointed” as missionaries with Africa Inland Mission. We hope to be moved to Nairobi, Kenya by next July to serve as full-time missionaries there! The process was prompted by Andy’s trip to North Africa which made a profound impression upon him. I (Lesa) had felt drawn towards missions, particularly Africa, since I was 15 and had pursued the subject in college and seminary. So when he came back on fire, I wasn’t sure what to think! We prayed for four months. We eventually decided that we were being called to go somewhere, we just weren’t sure where! We took a wonderful trip to North Africa and Kenya last spring, which confirmed...

Meeting with AIM

This past weekend we met with David and Darlene Noden, the regional representatives for Africa Inland Mission. We had a great time talking with them about missions, and about the real, personal, and relational struggles that the mission field can create. Fits in nicely with the chapter on suffering I’m reading in John Piper’s Let the Nations Be Glad. Anyhow, Lesa and I feel led to pursue a position with AIM, hopefully with the media team in Nairobi. Right now we’re praying about the best time to do the “candidate week” in New York, which is required to be accepted as a missionary candidate. Their next candidate week is in November, the one after that is January. We’d like to do it as soon as possible so we can start raising funds, with the hopes of arriving in Africa maybe next fall. November is a bad month for us, though, the busiest time of year for church...

Nairobi

Our overnight flight to Kenya was very pleasant, and the Kenya Airways plane was absolutely the nicest plane we’d ever ridden on. We arrived around 6:30 in the morning, and were totally wasted. We slept maybe an hour. Sydney’s benedryll wore off shortly after supper, and she was up most of the flight. We met my uncle Roger and aunt Shirley (missionaries with AIM) at the airport, and they took us to a friends house for a short nap. Shirley then drove us through Nairobi (an adrenaline rush, if it’s your first time) to Rosslyn Academy, where Lesa and I led worship for a chapel service. This is the school where my cousins, Rachel and Hannah, attend. It was beautiful, as was Nairobi in general. Lots of trees and flowering vegetation, and such a great, mild climate that the school campus was a real open-air architecture. After lunch at Rosslyn, we went to an orphanage for infants who were orphaned by AIDS. Many of them had tested positive for AIDS because their mothers had AIDS, but we found out in many cases they end up not being infected at all. The next day we had planned a tour of the Kibera slums, but ended up spending the morning at the doctors office as Sydney was throwing up again, and had developed strange spots all over her torso and arms and legs. We thought it might have been an allergic reaction to the malaria meds she had just started taking, or maybe an interaction with the chickenpox vaccine she had had along with a buch of other required vaccines before...
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